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Latest News:

04.04.14

ERIH Annual Conference 2014 - Call for papers now open

This year´s conference subject is "Networks of Industrial Heritage. Founding - Managing - Funding –...


24.01.14

ERIH Annual Conference 2013 - Presentations now online

The 2013 ERIH Conference took place in the Ruhr


02.12.13

ERIH Conference 2014 - Save the date

The ERIH Conference 2014 will take place from 1 to 3 October 2014 at the ERIH Anchor Point Cromford...


Welcome

to the European Route of Industrial Heritage, the tourism information network of industrial heritage in Europe. 

Currently we present more than 1,000 sites in 43 European countries. Among these sites there are 80 Anchor Points which build the virtual ERIH main route. On sixteen Regional Routes you can discover the industrial history of these landscapes in detail. All sites relate to thirteen European Theme Routes which show the diversity of European industrial history and their common roots.

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Anchor Point of the Day
The mine, The Carreau Wendel Museum | Petite-Rosselle

The sheer size of the central tip is enough to give you an idea of what was going on here...

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Anchor Points

Anchor points illustrate the complete range of European industrial history.
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Regional Routes

The Regional Routes link landscapes and sites which have left their mark on European industrial history.
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European Theme Routes

Theme Routes take up specific questions relating to European industrial history.
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Biographies

History is always made by people. We present a selection of personalities who influenced the European industrial history.
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Do you know...

that the first person in the world to build a textile factory was a former wigmaker?

In 1771 in the village of Cromford, not far from Nottingham, a British citizen and former wigmaker by the name of Richard Arkwright invented a hitherto unheard of machine called the water frame. He harnessed the water from the River Derwent to drive the water wheels of a spinning frame that, until then, was only operated by hand. The water frame, as it was known, was able to spin fine yarn at breathtaking speed. The site of the factory is now an anchor point along the European Route of Industrial Heritage …

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This website was last modified on 8th April 2014.